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February 2020

Literary Parlor – Behind the Scenes or Thirty Years a Slave and Four in the White House

February 9 @ 1:30 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
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$15

Behind the Scenes or Thirty Years a Slave and Four in the White House by Elizabeth Keckley Join 19th-century bibliophile, Kate Howe, to discuss Elizabeth Keckley’s autobiography of her years as a dress designer and seamstress for Mary Todd Lincoln and other prominent Washington, D.C. women. After the publication of Behind the Scenes, Mary Todd Lincoln turned against Keckley, causing her to lose her prestigious clients. She died in poverty in 1907.

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March 2020

Deep Rivers – Opening Reception

March 7 @ 4:00 pm - 7:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
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$25

OPENING RECEPTION for Deep Rivers features actors portraying John Trower, the most prominent caterer in 19th-century Philadelphia and Elizabeth Keckley, a former slave who became the dressmaker for Mary Todd Lincoln.  Pianist, Stephen Page, performs music by Francis Johnson, the first African American composer to publish his compositions. Champagne and food selections from an 1890 Trower Catering menu are served to reception guests. This reception is open to the public. Cost: $25; Cost for neighbors living in 19144 zip code:…

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Coffee for Neighbors

March 14 @ 9:30 am - 11:30 am
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
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Free

Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion invites anyone living in the 19144 zip code to join us on select Saturday mornings for complimentary coffee, tea, hot chocolate, and pastries or cookies. Learn about the 1860s section of our museum and chat with your neighbors. A trained docent will be on hand to answer your questions!

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Tea with Frederick Douglass

March 20 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
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$30

In 1844, at the age of 26, Frederick Douglass was invited by abolitionists to speak on the lawn of Independence Hall. Douglass had a natural connection with Philadelphia as this was the first Northern city he came to upon his escape. It is a testament to Douglass’ courage that he came to Philadelphia, so close to his old master’s state of Maryland, to give this speech. In March 2020 Douglass will return to Philadelphia in a one-man show based on…

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Tea with Frederick Douglass

March 21 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
+ Google Map
$30

In 1844, at the age of 26, Frederick Douglass was invited by abolitionists to speak on the lawn of Independence Hall. Douglass had a natural connection with Philadelphia as this was the first Northern city he came to upon his escape. It is a testament to Douglass’ courage that he came to Philadelphia, so close to his old master’s state of Maryland, to give this speech. In March 2020 Douglass will return to Philadelphia in a one-man show based on…

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Tea with Frederick Douglass

March 21 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
+ Google Map
$30

In 1844, at the age of 26, Frederick Douglass was invited by abolitionists to speak on the lawn of Independence Hall. Douglass had a natural connection with Philadelphia as this was the first Northern city he came to upon his escape. It is a testament to Douglass’ courage that he came to Philadelphia, so close to his old master’s state of Maryland, to give this speech. In March 2020 Douglass will return to Philadelphia in a one-man show based on…

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Tea with Frederick Douglass

March 27 @ 7:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
+ Google Map
$30

In 1844, at the age of 26, Frederick Douglass was invited by abolitionists to speak on the lawn of Independence Hall. Douglass had a natural connection with Philadelphia as this was the first Northern city he came to upon his escape. It is a testament to Douglass’ courage that he came to Philadelphia, so close to his old master’s state of Maryland, to give this speech. In March 2020 Douglass will return to Philadelphia in a one-man show based on…

Find out more »

Tea with Frederick Douglass

March 28 @ 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
+ Google Map
$30

In 1844, at the age of 26, Frederick Douglass was invited by abolitionists to speak on the lawn of Independence Hall. Douglass had a natural connection with Philadelphia as this was the first Northern city he came to upon his escape. It is a testament to Douglass’ courage that he came to Philadelphia, so close to his old master’s state of Maryland, to give this speech. In March 2020 Douglass will return to Philadelphia in a one-man show based on…

Find out more »

Tea with Frederick Douglass

March 28 @ 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
+ Google Map
$30

In 1844, at the age of 26, Frederick Douglass was invited by abolitionists to speak on the lawn of Independence Hall. Douglass had a natural connection with Philadelphia as this was the first Northern city he came to upon his escape. It is a testament to Douglass’ courage that he came to Philadelphia, so close to his old master’s state of Maryland, to give this speech. In March 2020 Douglass will return to Philadelphia in a one-man show based on…

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Literary Parlor – Eight Cousins

March 29 @ 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm
Ebenezer Maxwell Mansion, 200 W. Tulpehocken Street
Philadelphia, PA 19144 United States
+ Google Map
$15

Eight Cousins was published in 1875 by American novelist Louisa May Alcott. It is the story of Rose Campbell, a lonely and sickly girl who has been recently orphaned and must now reside with her maiden great aunts, the matriarchs of her wealthy Boston family. Join 19th-century bibliophile, Kate Howe, for an interesting discussion.

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